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Recently, from the perspective of SDGs

Insect food is attracting attention.

Being featured on TV and SNS

Many of you must have seen it.

Here are the nutritional and taste benefits.

“Not just good for the environment”

We will deliver the charm of edible crickets.

rich in protein

The attraction of crickets is protein. The protein content of domestic Futahoshi cricket powder “Grilas Powder” is about 76.3%*1. This is almost the same as the amount of commercially available whey protein, and you can see the amount compared to chicken (26.3%), which has an image of being high in protein *2.

*1: Inspection at Japan Food Research Laboratories

*2: Standard Tables of Food Composition in Japan 2020 (8th revision)

Along with carbohydrates and lipids, protein is one of the three major nutrients essential to our lives. Carbohydrates and lipids are mainly used as energy, whereas protein is the element that makes up all parts of the body, such as muscles, bones, skin, hair, and nails. Therefore, lack of protein can cause not only muscle but also hair and rough skin. In addition, since it is also used as a visceral and neurotransmitter, it may lead to a decrease in immune function and concentration.

Rich in vitamins and minerals

Rich in protein is one of the attractions of crickets, but did you know that they also contain many other vitamins and minerals? Here are some of the nutrients that are unique to crickets.

[Biotin]
A vitamin related to skin and hair health, a deficiency can lead to atopic dermatitis, hair loss, loss of appetite, and depression. Crickets contain 102 μg of biotin per 100 g, as well as folic acid and vitamin B6.

【iron】
Iron is a component of red blood cells in the body and plays a role in carrying oxygen throughout the body. Therefore, it is a nutrient that affects a wide range of things such as thinking ability, memory ability, and exercise ability. Grilous powder contains about four times the iron content of beef liver per equivalent amount, and since it is in powder form, it can be easily incorporated into daily cooking.

Dietary fiber

Cricket shells contain a lot of natural dietary fiber called chitin. In fact, in overseas research, there are also papers* that the intestinal environment of people who eat cricket powder has improved. It may be difficult to imagine, but crickets are actually good ingredients for "intestinal activity". In addition, Grilus Powder is processed by crushing crickets with their shells, so you can take them without losing dietary fiber. As an aside, mushrooms, which are a type of filamentous fungi, also contain this chitin.

*Source: Stull, VJ, Finer, E., Bergmans, RS et al. Impact

of Edible Cricket Consumption on Gut Microbiota in

Healthy Adults, a Double-blind, Randomized Crossover

Trial. Scientific Reports 8, 10762 (2018).

Crickets are biologically similar to shrimp. For this reason, crickets have a fragrant flavor and umami similar to crustaceans, and are often referred to as "shrimp-like." In fact, Grilous powder contains an extremely large amount of glutamic acid, one of the umami components, at 7,100 mg per 100 g, which is several times that of kelp*.

*Reference: Umami Information Center, Specified Non-Profit Organization

The Seatria series uses domestically produced Futahoshi crickets that have been processed into food ingredients such as "Grilous powder" and "Grilous extract". Crickets taste like shrimp as they are, but when processed into raw materials, they can be applied to more dishes.

The Seatria series uses domestically produced Futahoshi crickets that have been processed into food ingredients such as "Grilous powder" and "Grilous extract". Crickets taste like shrimp as they are, but when processed into raw materials, they can be applied to more dishes.

It is said that the societal issue known as the "protein crisis" will occur as early as 2025 to 2030. It is When that happens, people will be born into starvation due to lack of protein. During that time, deforestation and marine pollution progressed further due to the mass breeding of cattle and pigs, and the global environment deteriorated.

"Insect food" is expected as a solution to this problem. Insects are known worldwide as a next-generation protein source with an overwhelmingly low impact on the global environment because they require an overwhelmingly small amount of food, water, and greenhouse gas emissions when reared. expected from within. In fact, in 2013, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) submitted a report on the insect diet and protein crisis.

Among them, crickets are particularly noteworthy. Crickets are easy to breed, and because they are omnivorous and have high reproductive power, they can be cultivated on a large scale. And above all, it has a good taste, so there are high expectations for solving future food and nutrition problems and global environmental problems.

The crickets used in the Seatria series take advantage of these characteristics and are raised on 100% food loss-derived feed. Food waste used for bait is clean, including wheat bran. We have a unique combination of them so that the crickets grow deliciously and healthily.

Insect food has recently been attracting attention from the perspective of SDGs.

Many of you may have seen it featured on TV or on social media.

Here, we will introduce the appeal of edible crickets that are “not only good for the environment”, such as their nutritional and taste benefits.

rich in protein

The attraction of crickets is protein. The protein content of domestic Futahoshi cricket powder “Grilas Powder” is about 76.3%*1. This is almost the same as the amount of commercially available whey protein, and you can see the amount compared to chicken (26.3%), which has an image of being high in protein *2.

*1: Inspection at Japan Food Research Laboratories

*2: Standard Tables of Food Composition in Japan 2020 (8th revision)

Along with carbohydrates and lipids, protein is one of the three major nutrients essential to our lives. Carbohydrates and lipids are mainly used as energy, whereas protein is the element that makes up all parts of the body, such as muscles, bones, skin, hair, and nails. Therefore, lack of protein can cause not only muscle but also hair and rough skin. In addition, since it is also used as a visceral and neurotransmitter, it may lead to a decrease in immune function and concentration.

Rich in vitamins and minerals

Rich in protein is one of the attractions of crickets, but did you know that they also contain many other vitamins and minerals? Here are some of the nutrients that are unique to crickets.

[Biotin]

A vitamin related to skin and hair health, a deficiency can lead to atopic dermatitis, hair loss, loss of appetite, and depression. Crickets contain 102 μg of biotin per 100 g, as well as folic acid and vitamin B6.

【iron】

Iron is a component of red blood cells in the body and plays a role in carrying oxygen throughout the body. Therefore, it is a nutrient that affects a wide range of things such as thinking ability, memory ability, and exercise ability. Grilous powder contains about four times the iron content of beef liver per equivalent amount, and since it is in powder form, it can be easily incorporated into daily cooking.

Dietary fiber

Cricket shells contain a lot of natural dietary fiber called chitin. In fact, in overseas research, there are also papers* that the intestinal environment of people who eat cricket powder has improved. It may be difficult to imagine, but crickets are actually good ingredients for "intestinal activity". In addition, Grilus Powder is processed by crushing crickets with their shells, so you can take them without losing dietary fiber. As an aside, mushrooms, which are a type of filamentous fungi, also contain this chitin.

*Source: Stull, VJ, Finer, E., Bergmans, RS et al. Impact of Edible Cricket Consumption on Gut

Microbiota in Healthy Adults, a Double-blind, Randomized Crossover Trial. Scientific Reports 8,

10762 (2018).

Crickets are biologically similar to shrimp. For this reason, crickets have a fragrant flavor and umami similar to crustaceans, and are often referred to as "shrimp-like." In fact, Grilous powder contains an extremely large amount of glutamic acid, one of the umami components, at 7,100 mg per 100 g, which is several times that of kelp*.

*Reference: Umami Information Center, Specified Non-Profit Organization

The Seatria series uses domestically produced Futahoshi crickets that have been processed into food ingredients such as "Grilous powder" and "Grilous extract". Crickets taste like shrimp as they are, but when processed into raw materials, they can be applied to more dishes.

Grilous powder, which is made by pulverizing domestic Futahoshi crickets, can easily add umami to your usual dishes. In addition, Grilus extract, which extracts the umami of crickets, is a versatile seasoning similar to oyster sauce and fish sauce, and can be used instead of soy sauce to create a taste.

It is said that the societal issue known as the "protein crisis" will occur as early as 2025 to 2030. It is When that happens, people will be born into starvation due to lack of protein. During that time, deforestation and marine pollution progressed further due to the mass breeding of cattle and pigs, and the global environment deteriorated.

"Insect food" is expected as a solution to this problem. Insects are known worldwide as a next-generation protein source with an overwhelmingly low impact on the global environment because they require an overwhelmingly small amount of food, water, and greenhouse gas emissions when reared. expected from within. In fact, in 2013, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) submitted a report on the insect diet and protein crisis.

Among them, crickets are particularly noteworthy. Crickets are easy to breed, and because they are omnivorous and have high reproductive power, they can be cultivated on a large scale. And above all, it has a good taste, so there are high expectations for solving future food and nutrition problems and global environmental problems.

The crickets used in the Seatria series take advantage of these characteristics and are raised on 100% food loss-derived feed. Food waste used for bait is clean, including wheat bran. We have a unique combination of them so that the crickets grow deliciously and healthily.